Father of the Video Game

Ralph worked for Sanders Associates in 1966, now BAE Systems when he envisioned a more interactive relationship between man and machine. His "Brown Box" built in 1968 and patented in 1969 was licensed to Magnavox and sold as Odyssey - the world's first video game. Baer is widely-accepted as the "Father of the Video Game". He has been awarded the National Medal of Technology and was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame before he passed at 92 after living in Manchester, NH for 42 years. 

   The New York Times Celebrating Ralph's Life     "Ralph H. Baer, Inventor of First System for Home Video Games, Is Dead at 92."

The New York Times Celebrating Ralph's Life

"Ralph H. Baer, Inventor of First System for Home Video Games, Is Dead at 92."

  Baer's Manchester Workshop now resides in the Smithsonian Innovation Wing   Before he passed, Ralph donated some of his test units, original notes and countless testaments to his creativity to the Smithsonian Museum. Read more about it and see the collection catalogued here. 

Baer's Manchester Workshop now resides in the Smithsonian Innovation Wing

Before he passed, Ralph donated some of his test units, original notes and countless testaments to his creativity to the Smithsonian Museum. Read more about it and see the collection catalogued here. 

  Ralph Baer's Personal Website   Untouched since he passed in 2014, Ralph's website still displays his inventions and life's accomplishments in first person.

Ralph Baer's Personal Website

Untouched since he passed in 2014, Ralph's website still displays his inventions and life's accomplishments in first person.